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Community organizer discusses life as a senior in Little Tokyo

The following post was written by intern Maggie Su as part of a series of profiles of API members of the community.

Yasue Clark, a community organizer at Little Tokyo Service Center (LTSC), works with low-income seniors who live in affordable housing units in Little Tokyo. She has worked at LTSC for the past seven years, advocating for seniors who are ill-equipped to raise their own voice.

About 800 seniors live in Little Tokyo, according to Clark. Most are monolingual, speaking either Japanese or Korean.

“Because they’re monolingual and also [because] they’re low-income, their voice hardly ever gets heard,” Clark said. “Most of them are invisible.”

Clark, a Tokyo native, does not speak Korean, so she primarily works with the Japanese-speaking seniors. Nevertheless, she does her best to organize activities for the seniors, planning crafts, workshops and field trips. She hopes to take them to the Downtown Women’s Center soon in an attempt to address misconceptions they may have about the homeless.

Compared to Tokyo, Los Angeles is much less pedestrian oriented; far fewer people walk on LA streets. Clark believes insufficient public transportation is a major contributing factor to LA’s excess of cars, which, in turn, makes the city less hospitable to pedestrians.

“Most of the time it feels like cars have the right of way, not pedestrians,” Clark said.

Furthermore, many sidewalks are poorly maintained, with exposed tree roots that pose a tripping hazard and nonfunctional street lights that make residents feel unsafe after dark.

Little Tokyo, though, is a more pedestrian-friendly neighborhood than most in LA. Both a grocery store and a medical center with doctors’ offices, a pharmacy and a blood testing lab are within walking distance for senior residents.

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Biking enthusiast discusses cycling in Los Angeles, Orange County

The following post was written by intern Maggie Su as part of a series of profiles of API members of the community.

Most days, Viet Bui commutes by bike to his job as an academic advisor at the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music, where he has worked for the past three years. He only recently rediscovered his passion for cycling since leaving the corporate banking world in 2012, returning to school for a master’s degree in education.

Bui did not learn how to ride a bike until the age of 11 or 12, when he was finally motivated to teach himself after watching other kids on the block. Eventually, he began to ride to school and on boy scout cycling trips. Now, Bui considers himself a biking enthusiast who cycles both for the health benefits of the sport and as a means of stress relief. He usually prefers to ride solo, citing the opportunity for contemplation and meditation that cycling alone allows him.

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Dog lover discusses parks and bikes in Los Angeles versus Tokyo

The following post was written by intern Maggie Su as part of a series of profiles of API members of the community.

Ranko Fukuda has a foot in two different worlds. Having grown up in both Tokyo and Los Angeles, she has a multicultural background that gives her a unique take on her surroundings.

Fukuda’s background is in banking; she worked with Capital One straight out of college, where she stayed for over a decade. Now, she works in the nonprofit world, running an adult education program that trains underserved adults to begin a career in banking. She made the switch after moving to LA from the East Coast, following her 2011 stint in Japan to aid tsunami recovery efforts.

Thoughtful and reflective, Fukuda notices differences in even the mundane aspects of life in each city. Tokyo citizens, for example, are generally diligent about not leaving trash behind, despite the reduced number of trash cans in the city. This is in sharp contrast to the hot Cheetos bags that litter the sidewalks near her residence, presumably left there by students from one of the three schools in the area.

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Great Streets director discusses Los Angeles transportation, draws comparisons to New York

The following post was written by intern Maggie Su as part of a series of profiles of API members of the community.

Naomi Iwasaki, a Los Angeles native, is a self-proclaimed transportation nerd.

“You know how people talk about an acting bug? You act and you just get bit by this bug and you love it and you want to be an actor? I think that there’s a transportation nerd bug also, and that some people just love maps and love buses and love the way that people circulate throughout a city. I’m one of those nerds,” Iwasaki said.

As such, she is well-suited for her job as director of neighborhood services and Great Streets at the office of LA Mayor Eric Garcetti, where she works with city departments such as the Department of Transportation (DOT) to oversee projects designed to improve street safety, design and development.

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Bike to China alum discusses Chinatown park access

The following post was written by intern Maggie Su as part of a series of profiles of API members of the community.

Kevin Liao may one day be your orthodontist. But today, he’s a biology student at California State University, Los Angeles. His ultimate goal is to open multiple dentistry practices, some of which would serve as community centers providing orthodontic services at low costs, if not for free, depending on the client’s need.

“The government says braces are not a necessity, more of a privilege,” Liao said. “But I know how some individuals, if they don’t have a perfect smile, it kind of impacts them. They may not want to smile.”

The community dentistry centers Liao hopes to one day open are his way of giving back to the community — a continuation of the work he already does with Para Los Niños, a nonprofit that provides social services and education opportunities to Los Angeles youth. Liao, who is based in Lincoln Heights, has worked with the organization for the past four years. He is involved with programs such as the Men of Action Initiative and the Escalera Program, both of which are in partnership with the National Council of La Raza (NCLR).

Liao has also been instrumental in much of APIFM’s work. He recently collaborated with Program Director Scott Chan to form Chinatown Fit Club — a weekly gathering of runners and walkers at LA State Historic Park. Their goal in forming the club, Liao said, was to encourage people to utilize the recently reopened recreational space while bringing residents of neighboring communities together.

LA State Historic Park is a 32-acre space — by far the largest park in the area. Despite this, there are only 1.6 acres of park land per 1,000 residents in LA Central City North compared to the county average of 3.3 acres per 1,000. This relative lack of park space makes it critical that residents fully utilize LA State Historic Park. Alpine Recreation Center, the second largest park space in the area, is 1.94 acres, but is often overused due to Chinatown’s high population density.

Although the turnout for Chinatown Fit Club has improved since its first meeting at the end of April, attracting the elderly population of Chinatown continues to be a challenge. Many of the elderly Chinese residents choose instead to frequent the Alpine Recreation Center, where they have been doing 6:45 a.m. tai chi for years.

“It’s hard to teach an old dog new tricks,” Liao said. “They’re just so accustomed to their way of life, their habit.”

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Local leaders discuss Cambodian heritage, police profiling and park access in Long Beach

The following post was written by intern Maggie Su as the first in a series of profiles of API members of the community.

Ladine Chan and Patrick Duong are not your typical father-son duo. In fact, they aren’t related at all. But, judging from their good-natured banter, one might assume otherwise. Chan, Program Coordinator for Educated Men with Meaningful Messages (EM3) — a youth program under Families in Good Health at Dignity Health St. Mary Medical Center in Long Beach — works with primarily Cambodian youth, aged 14 to 19. He himself was once a youth in the program over a decade ago. Duong, who just completed his first year at Long Beach City College, is a recent graduate of the program. He credits EM3 with helping him finish high school.

As residents of Long Beach, Chan and Duong have limited access to safe parks. Most are poorly maintained and rife with gang activity. Furthermore, Long Beach residents must also contend with a lack of access to healthy foods. In a neighborhood where the most readily available groceries are from corner stores or liquor stories, many families have to travel at least three or four miles in order to purchase nutritious goods.

Despite the area’s lack of resources, programs such as EM3 exist to help residents combat the odds they face. The EM3 youth attend workshops every Friday on subjects ranging from life skills to violence in the community to healthy relationships. The program also teaches youth about their own cultural heritage, given that the majority of their parents are refugees of the Cambodian genocide under the Khmer Rouge regime.

“It gets very emotional to talk about what happened during the genocide, very traumatizing,” Chan said. “That’s why some of the youth get lost in it.”

Many members of the Cambodian community in Long Beach, which Chan estimates comprises 30 to 40 percent of the total population in the area — the largest Cambodian population anywhere outside of Phnom Penh — suffer from untreated PTSD. This makes it difficult for parents, unwilling to bring up the past, to discuss their background with their children. The result is that Cambodian youth know little about what the previous generation experienced.

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HEAL Community Fest

The following post was written by intern Maggie Su to update APIFM supporters on current initiatives.

At Search to Involve Pilipino Americans (SIPA) Saturday morning, APIFM hosted a Healthy Eating and Active Living (HEAL) Community Festival, sponsored by Champions for Change and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Co-sponsors included SIPA, Pilipino Workers’ Center (PWC), Para Los Niños, the office of Mitch O’Farrell, Mother and Vision Zero.

Attendees started off by participating in a Zumba class led by Pamela Price, laughing as they danced to upbeat pop music. Afterward, they headed indoors to sample refreshing fruit smoothies. Ivy Daulo demonstrated how attendees could prepare the smoothies at home while Esther Lee answered questions about nutrition and healthy eating. They learned about the Rethink Your Drink campaign, which focuses on how we can choose healthier drinks such as water and beverages without added sugar. Finally, Ivy did a demo for mango black bean salad, which attendees also got to sample.

To conclude the morning, raffle tickets were drawn; a lucky few received reusable bags containing Champions for Change t-shirts, aprons, cutting boards, among other goodies. Those who were still up for it did a little extra Zumba on their way out.

All in all, it was a fun and productive morning. Thank you to everyone who attended.

If you missed out, Ivy leads weekly HEAL workshops at PWC on Thursdays at 6 p.m. All are welcome!

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Healthy Korean Food!

The following post was written by intern Maggie Su to update APIFM supporters on current initiatives.

On Tuesday evening, I got to watch a group of Korean women test a handful of traditional recipes. They prepared dishes such as chapchae (stir-fried noodles) and bibimbap (a spicy mixed rice bowl), both of which were delicious. Health Education Coordinator Esther Lee was present to translate, while Monica Bhagwan, program manager for Leah’s Pantry, observed and asked questions about the cooking process.

This session was part of an effort to develop Japanese, Korean and Vietnamese recipes for Eatfresh.org, one of multiple databases of healthy recipes for low-income individuals and families eligible for CalFresh/SNAP. In the past, these databases have not included many culturally relevant dishes; APIFM in partnership with Leah’s Pantry hopes to change that one recipe at a time, gradually increasing the number of recipes from Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander cultures.

APIFM staff enlisted the help of community members to brainstorm recipes and prepare the dishes in collaboration with Leah’s Pantry staff. The recipes were developed to align with dietary guidelines suggesting low sodium, low sugar and less fat. For example, the chapchae was prepared with less soy sauce.

The Korean recipe development group was comprised of participants from APIFM’s Healthy Eating & Active Living (HEAL) workshop series at Koreatown Youth and Community Center (KYCC)‘s affordable housing, the Menlo Family Apartments in Koreatown.

The Koreatown HEAL participants will also be offering a free class, How to Make Kimchi, 4:30 p.m. June 17 at Doulos Mission Church, so come by and learn from the experts!

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Staff Profile: Linda Huynh

What’s your role at APIFM? How’d you first get connected? What are you working on?

Hi! I am Linda Huynh and I am APIFM’s Community Engagement Coordinator. I was introduced to APIFM back when it use to be called APIOPA. In a previous job, I partnered with APIOPA and the students of Mark Keppel High School in promoting environmental justice. Together, we promoted safer bike routes in Monterey Park with the help of BIKE SGV. In addition, we promoted cleaner air, especially around the classrooms of Mark Keppel (which is right next to the 10 freeway). I am currently outreaching and engaging with community members to participate in our Healthy Eating and Active Living program. In this program, we are providing spaces for participants to become more knowledgeable in how to eat healthier, how to cook healthier (through cooking demonstrations), and to become more physically active.

Why is APIFM’s work important to you?

I believe it’s important to open up more opportunities for Asians living in the United States, because it will ultimately give us a fairer chance to succeed in life. I am drawn to APIFM’s mission to cultivate a healthier movement for Asian communities. I LOVE APIFM’s approach in providing healthier access to foods, nutrition education and physical activities. The organization is providing opportunities for Asian communities to live a more sustainable lifestyle.

In addition, I find it humbling to work with Asian-ethnic and multi-generational groups (especially since I grew up Asian-American to first generation parents). I have experience working with Chinese and Vietnamese groups in the San Gabriel Valley. Therefore, I am looking forward to expanding my horizon with other Asian-ethnic groups in Los Angeles. APIFM is giving me the opportunity to outreach and build relationships with community partners and residents of Chinatown, Historic Filipinotown, Little Tokyo, and Koreatown.

What’s your life like outside of work? What are your hobbies/passions?

In my off time, I love traveling, visiting museums and gardens, and eating out in the SGV. In addition, I find it relaxing to take pictures and experimenting with different cameras. I get my inspiration from my favorite cinematographer, Christopher Doyle.

Linda Huynh is a Community Engagement Coordinator at APIFM. She has eight years of nonprofit experience. She earned her B.A. in Television & Film Media Studies: Tele-communications and minored in Art Studio from California State University-Los Angeles. Linda identifies as ethnically Chinese, Southeast Asian-American and uses she/her pronouns.

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Chinatown Office: Wish List

We moved into our comfy Chinatown satellite office early last month. No worries, you did not miss the grand opening! Before inviting our friends and families over, we wanted to clean up the space and get it well furnished. Once fully operational, this space will be our headquarters for healthy eating/active living programming we are running for API communities in Chinatown, Historic Filipinotown, Little Tokyo, and Koreatown!

 

In order to open our doors, we need your help! We’re still short items for our new office and would appreciate any of the following items. We will gladly write a tax donation letter for all donations given to us.

 

Decorations:
  • wall decals
  • culturally relevant decorations
Furniture:
  • office tables (5)
  • side table
  • office chairs
  • trash bins
  • couch
  • lockable cabinets/drawers

Electronics:

  • microwave
  • mini-fridge
  • hot water pot (similar item)
  • office supplies – staplers, tape, binder clips
  • all-in-one printer/scanner

Other:

  • cleaning supplies
  • Brita Filter

*Updated May 9, 2017

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