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2018 Taiwan Trip Recap

By Kyle Tsukahira

Back in September 2018 APIFM Program Manager Kyle Tsukahira had the opportunity to travel to Taiwan in order to facilitate an series of air quality workshops for students from Wu Ling High School in Taoyuan City and 15 teachers from different schools around Taiwan who are participating in Taiwan’s Ecocampus program.

The workshops focused on educating, engaging, and empowering both the Taiwanese students and teachers about the impacts of air pollution and ways they can advocate for sustainable change in their communities. Kyle also had the opportunity to meet with the principal and other school administrators of Wu Ling in order to discuss the possibility of connecting some of their students with the students we are working with in Los Angeles.

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6 Do’s and Don’ts of CalFresh Benefits

By Finola Rodriguez, APIFM Health Educator

Freshly graduated from UC Irvine, I was recruited by Americorps to be an academic interventionist for 11 middle schoolers in South LA. Knowing I would survive on a modest bi-weekly stipend, I was encouraged to sign up for food stamps, which in the end taught me a ton about the level of food access the community I was serving had earning a similar monthly income. I am not a medical professional, so please take the following Do’s and Don’t tips just as suggestions and recommendations! Enjoy.

1. Do know what type of food stamps you have.

There are two kinds: EBT SNAP and EBT cash. Once after my long 10-hour day of service with Americorps, I saw a local Wendy’s with a banner that read “Accepts EBT.” I rolled through the drive-thru to discover I only had EBT SNAP, meaning I could only use my card to buy room-temp or cold food and beverages from the grocery store. Immediately my plans to use my food stamps to buy hot chicken, burgers, fries and a coffee went down the drain. Nonetheless it was a great opportunity to challenge my cooking capabilities, not settle for drive-thru meals, and better plan my nourishment for the future.

2. Don’t try to use most of your monthly food stamps on pre-packaged meals.

As tempting as it is to buy already made salads, wraps, soups, and snacks (trust me I am guilty as charged), it is not as sustainable as you think. Those were made to only last you one meal, not the whole week. Try to limit the packaged lunches to 1-2 a week max. You will get a much higher yield when you mimic some of those favorite meals while buying your own ingredients and dedicating one day of the week to make at least 3 portions for the days to come.  Not only is that more cost-efficient, but it turns out to be fun when you can dedicate time to cooking.

3. Do take your lifestyle into consideration.

Be more compassionate with yourself when planning your next meals. In a culture where it is so easy to be wrapped up in the next fad diet and the pressure to eat as fresh/organic possible, we also have to consider shelf-life and who we are providing for. Sometimes I had to buy flash-frozen fruits and vegetables because I overbought fresh produce previously. When I got too ambitious about my nourishment, my eyes would get too big at the grocery store. This unfortunately led to wasted benefits, a smelly fridge, extra money spent on meals outside, and a hungry belly. Do some research online on ‘minimal waste’ recipes and see how you can optimize your meals and time while still getting your daily nutrients. I use a lot of my leftover vegetables to make broth or sometimes freeze fruits and vegetables to make smoothies for breakfast the next morning.

4. Don’t overcomplicate when and where you buy your groceries.

Simple is better. When I first moved to Alhambra it took a couple weeks of driving around to find out which stores were around me, their opening and closing times, and when the less busy hours were to go. As much as I wanted to go to Whole Foods with my roommates I also had to keep in mind I had very limited funds in my account and I could not afford the freshly pressed juice and pre-made sushi 24/7. That being said, I did enjoy seeking advice from members of my family of their practices they utilized when they immigrated to the U.S. There can be affordable, fresh fruits and vegetables at your local 99 Cents Store, Food For Less, and 99 Ranch. It’s also helpful to look for catalogs featuring special coupons and deals in the grocery stores, consider the seasonal fruits and vegetables (they will be most likely cheaper), and dedicate time each week to make future meals for yourself. Your wellness is worth it.

5. Do take time to understand the expiration and application dates your card has.

You will get letters in the mail regarding the status of your benefits and when to reapply. Be very punctual as they need to update documentation every 6 months. So after about 5 months you will get instructions on how to do so, as well as the dates your benefits will cancel if you do not yield to their procedures. Luckily they do have the number of your social worker and they list all the documents you need to submit. If you have smartphone, consider downloading a free scanning app to ease your submission process. I would take pictures of the documents they needed (i.e. monthly rent amounts, income documents, utility bills etc.). And if you are confused just give them a call to confirm the status or check online every couple days. Do not wait last minute!

6. Don’t assume that your food stamps refill on the first of every month.

I spent my monthly amount prematurely and waltzed into a local Ralphs the first of the month. I slid my EBT card and found out that there was no balance. I was so embarrassed at the checkout and took out my debit card to pay for my groceries. After doing more research I found out that the last number of my card was the date in which they stamps refilled. For example, if the last number on your card says 6 then you will get your monthly benefit amount on the 6th of that month.

Closing thoughts…

I am sure there are many other things I learned during my year on food stamps, but if I were going to leave you with anything…. It is to not compare your food journey with anyone else’s! We all need assistance from time to time and having CalFresh can be used as an opportunity to learn proper budgeting, nourishing, and timing for your specific lifestyle. You are allowed to love yourself through feeding your body with the nutrients it needs. Listen to how your body responds to certain foods and be mindful that we all come from different cultures, backgrounds, stages of life and body types so of course your meals will look a little different.

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My APIFM internship experience – Jingtian Wu

During my internship, my favorite activity was APIFM’s produce stand at Little Tokyo. It provides fresh produce to local residences, and it educates local businesses about the fact that a lot of people are receiving government benefits. It unites the community together. By tracking how many people are on governmental benefits, such as medical and EBT card, we are trying to convince local businesses to accept EBT cards. Other interns from UCLA and I went to every single store in Little Tokyo talking about our produce stand and posting flyers on their window. I feel that it is such an excellent chance for us as interns to know the local communities by visiting all the stores. I am a pro in Little Tokyo now! : )

Youth Nutrition Workshop in Koreatown

I did nutrition education with other interns at Koreatown Youth and Community Center. We led the elementary students and preschoolers to do physical activity. Also, we educated them about seeds and gardening. I feel that it is so hard to teach them about nutrition because they do not understand and a lot of them are picky eaters. Reflecting on what I read in the book Fearless Feeding, I realize the best way to educate them about foods is to expose them to a variety of flavors and encourage them to try new things. Even though they are picky eaters and sometimes they will try something and spit them out, they are still open to trying new flavors especially when it is a group activity. There was a girl who refused most of the items we gave her, but she decided to try when she saw her friends all tried. They held the foods counting down from three and ate together. Even though they ended up running to the trash and spitting out all the foods, it was still nice to see that they were willing to try. I feel this kind of group activity of trying new things is also a form of family table. When kids look at their friends and family are having something they haven’t have before, they will be more willing to try. It proves that the family table is a great way to raise a non-picky eater.

Chinatown Residents Fundraising

In November 2018, I supported APIFM’s outreach tabling in Chinese American neighborhoods as well as nutriton workshops at Chinatown Service Center. Gladly, I met so many friendly first-generation Chinese immigrants. They came to our workshops for free cooking and Tai Chi classes. We did fundraising on the afternoon of Nov 10th to get money for the stretch band to help elders who come to our class exercise. People are very supportive. We collected enough money to purchase 30 stretch band in one day.

It is good to know that we have an organization that serves Asians and Pacific Islanders specifically. A lot of the things that they are doing benefit the entire community. It makes me want to contribute more to my community. As someone who holds a degree in nutrition, I can do something to promote the wellness and health of the community holistically.

Jingtian Wu interned with APIFM in Fall 2018 as part of a community rotation for her dietetic program at Pepperdine University.

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Farm to Chopsticks Awardee: Ken Lee

By Kyle Tsukahira

We are so excited to honor local farmer Ken Lee this year at Farm to Chopsticks. We’ve had the pleasure of partnering with Ken for the past 2 years to source organic citrus and stone fruit from his family farm located in Reedly, CA called Top Notch Produce. We love working with Ken because of his passion for the food that he grows and his commitment to providing the highest quality produce to the community. Your support helps us continue to work with farmers like Ken to get fresh, sustainably grown, and culturally relevant produce to the communities and families we serve. For more info please visit: www.apifm/ftc

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Farm to Chopsticks Awardee: Lisa Thong

By Scott Chan

If you don’t know Lisa Thong, you really should. Smart, passionate, strong-willed…these are just a few words that capture the dedication Lisa has had to community advocacy and social justice. Oh and one more word: humble.

I say humble because Lisa has done so much for APIFM, without ever asking for nor accepting credit. She just genuinely cares about the work we do around API health and food access, and has been a silent partner over the past 6 years. Whether it was helping us explore new funding and networking opportunities for our work with farmers, or presenting us with alternative forms of social enterprise for Food Roots, Lisa has always been in our corner, pushing us to take our work to the next level.

Come hear more about Lisa and why we’re giving her a well-deserved award at Farm to Chopsticks this year. More info here. 

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Farm to Chopsticks Awardee: Jessie Sanchez

Written by Diyana of APIFM staff

It’s hard to remember where I first met Jessie Sanchez (whom our whole team fondly refers to as Miss Jessie) because she showed up to our Healthy Eating & Active Living (HEAL) workshops in almost every neighborhood in the beginning! Whether it was our Tuesday sessions at LA State Historic Park, Wednesday mornings at Chinatown Service Center, or Friday nights at Pilipino Workers Center, Miss Jessie would be there, ready to soak up all she could. She took public transportation all the way from Eagle Rock, rain or shine. Miss Jessie told us she first found out about our HEAL classes from a flyer, and had been intently looking for ways to improve her eating habits after being diagnosed with diabetes and other diet-related conditions that are unfortunately so common now in API communities. Her determination to get better is impressive on its own, but we also deeply admire her equal commitment to helping others in her neighborhood and cultural community to access healthier options. She always took home as many of our HEAL class cookbooks as she could, so she could pass them out to neighbors, church friends, and even mail them to family in the Philippines. Miss Jessie also likes to share with others how she takes advantage of Market Match as part of her CalFresh benefits to afford more produce at farmers markets. All of her hard work has paid off in a big way, but I hate spoilers, so you’ll have to come to Farm to Chopsticks to hear the rest of the story from Miss Jessie, herself!

You can find out more and purchase your ticket by clicking here.

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Meet the “Master Griller” Chef Pablo Kim!

Join us this August 23, 2018 for API Forward Movement’s annual fundraiser, Farm to Chopsticks! We’re also thrilled to bring you a demo and tasting from Korean-Argentinian “master griller” CHEF PABLO KIM, founder of Pablo Kim’s Chimichurri and one of the top 11 finalists of Masterchef Latino 2017.

Buy your ticket here

Pablo Kim was born in Argentina. The son of Korean immigrants, he was raised in a mix of European, Latino, and Asian culture. In Argentina there are two major passions: fútbol and asado. Pablo was a fan of fútbol but he was fascinated with Argentinian barbecue since childhood. Starting as a teenager, Pablo made asado at the beach, on the street, and in the backyard for friends and family, incorporating Korean flavors with traditional Argentinian cooking.

Buy your ticket here

Immigrating to the United States in high school, Pablo graduated from UC Santa Barbara in 2007. Although initially working in finance, Pablo never forgot his passion for asado. In 2016, after observing that there was no widely-available brand of chimichurri in the American market, he decided to create his own brand: Pablo Kim’s Chimichurri. In 2017, Pablo was part of Masterchef Latino, making it into the top 11 finalists. After this experience, Pablo decided to start his catering service, with the intention to share the Argentinian Asado that he grew up with.

All proceeds from Farm to Chopsticks will support Forward Movement’s grassroots education and organizing for food, health, and social justice in AANHPI communities of Los Angeles County.

 

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Talking Pedestrian Safety in Chinatown

On August 2, 2018, APIFM held a Chinatown Pedestrian Safety meeting at Chinatown’s Fortune Gourmet Kitchen. Over thirty-five people from the community turned out! In an open discussion, attendees shared what they appreciate when walking in the streets of Chinatown, and discussed concerns about how it’s also unsafe. On the upside, Chinatown is “filled with Chinese culture” and “accessible services in diverse Chinese languages,” they shared. But residents are concerned about littering and “lots of trash on the streets.”

We planned to further discuss those specific concerns at future meetings, and will explore organizing a neighborhood cleanup day. The rest of our meeting that day focused on two campaigns: educating senior residents to not jaywalk and adding mirrors and multilingual warning signs at the narrow driveway of Peking Poultry.

After presenting evidence of the dangers of unsafe streets, APIFM asked the attendees to commit to the campaigns. Many signed up and we will meet weekly in the month of August 2018.

We’d like to thank the LA Chinatown Business Council and the California Office of Traffic Safety’s Go Human Local Community Engagement Program for their generous support of this pedestrian safety campaign!

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Resource: Rethink Your Boba by APIFM Intern Chris Hernandez

 

Many thanks to APIFM intern, Chris Hernandez, for creating this new resource on what’s in boba and how to make it a bit healthier! Download the full PDF here, and please feel free to distribute! Here’s a message from Chris:

My name is Christopher Hernandez and I am a 21-year old Filipino Nutritional Science student at California State University Los Angeles. I grew up in a predominately Asian neighborhood where drinking “boba” or “boba milk tea” was the daily norm. Being a student in the nutritional science field, I saw this as a learning experience during course of my education. I wanted to find out what exactly was in the average boba drink and relay that information to the surrounding community. This would allow an individual to “rethink their boba drink.” I understand that boba milk tea is a staple in many communities. I also provided ways in which an individual could make their drink “healthier.” I too am guilty of drinking boba as I work at a boba shop. My goal is to ensure that everyone makes smarter choices when ordering their next boba drink.Boba NutritionBoba 2

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